A CANADIAN PEACE INSTITUTE

SWOT ANALYSIS

Index

INTRODUCTION

1. STRENGTHS

2. WEAKNESSES

3. OPPORTUNITIES

4. THREATS

5. MAIN IDEAS FROM THE VISIONS, DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES

6. CONCLUSION

APPENDIX 1 - POTENTIAL MARKET AND/OR CUSTOMERS/CLIENTS FOR A CANADIAN PEACE INSTITUTE

APPENDIX 2 - PURPOSE OF A CANADIAN PEACE INSTITUTE

APPENDIX 3 - LEADERS IN PEACE EDUCATION

APPENDIX 4 - MAIN IDEAS FROM THE VISIONS

 


INTRODUCTION

For the purposes of preparing for a meeting of interested parties on September 29, 2000 in Hamilton, Ontario, I have assembled some information common to the review of any new enterprise.

Environmental Scan

A simple environmental scan was done by:

a) assembling a current inventory of Peace Education Programs in Canada. This can be found at http://www.peace.ca/univandcollegespeacestudiesprog.htm 

b) observation of the current peace environment in Canada

c) discussion with various Canadian Peace Researchers and Educators

d) a collection of visions from interested parties. These can be found at http://www.peace.ca/educationpartnerships.htm

e) identifying a preliminary list of potential markets and/or customers/clients for a Canadian Peace Institute (see Appendix 1)

f) identifying a preliminary purpose of a Canadian Peace Institute (see Appendix 2)

g) assembling a preliminary list of peace education leaders in Canada (see Appendix 3)

h) prototyping a Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace (found at http://www.peace.ca )

i) a review of six converging developments that will impact positively on peace education in the future. This can be found at http://www.peace.ca/sixdevelopments.htm

SWOT Analysis

For purposes of discussion, a simple SWOT Analysis was developed. "SWOT" stands for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. This is one method for analyzing new ventures. My analysis, in point form, follows.

Main Ideas from the Visions, differences and similarities

A synopsis of the main ideas from the "visions", their differences and similarities is provided.

 TOP

1. STRENGTHS

Identification of the strengths found in the Canadian environment, that will help the development of a Canadian Peace Institute:

- Canadian reputation and character (peaceful, position of trust, coalition builders)

- information (the most powerful resource) availability

- people resources available

- Internet available to promote communications, networking, support

- the solution is known: we know what to do to solve the most important issue in the world

- great need in the world (marketplace)

- the Canadian government has made commitments related to peace education and the Culture of Peace Program

- many Canadian Universities, Colleges and schools have Peace Studies Programs, or elements of them

- peace is transdisciplinary: it involves many programs or issues

- many organizations are currently teaching aspects of peace (eg. Canadian Red Cross, Peace by Peace, etc.)

- Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace has prototyped a methodology

- Educators are still the guardians of civilization. Canada must take the initiative during this hiatus. Peace is what we do and what we do best. We can well afford to establish a Canadian

University of Peace, and we have a responsibility to our youth to do so, so that they can stand on our shoulders now and in generations to come. (courtesy of Janet Hudgins)

- Maurice Strong is Chairman of the U.N. University of Peace in Costa Rica

- Lloyd Axworthy is soon to be Chairman of the UBC Global Studies Centre

 TOP

2. WEAKNESSES

Identification of the weaknesses found in the Canadian environment, that will have to be overcome for the development of a Canadian Peace Institute:

- lack of money (financial resources)

- lack of champions, high profile individuals, and peace education leaders (see Appendix 3)

- there will be a start up period where a Canadian Peace Institute may not be financially viable

- our political leaders have not acted in support

- there is no Canadian federal Department of Peace (as a result, no one in the federal government has a mandate for peace at home and abroad; hence it usually falls between the cracks; eg. the year 2000 Culture of Peace Program)

- many Canadian Universities have struggling (or no) Peace Studies Programs

- there is no Faculty of Peace in Universities (as a result, no one in most universities has a mandate for peace; hence it usually falls between the cracks; see next item also)

- in academia, Peace is a topic, not a discipline. That is, there are no methods of science or rhetoric that are unique to peace (courtesy of Floyd Rudmin)

 TOP

3. OPPORTUNITIES

Identification of the opportunities found in the Canadian environment, that will help the development of a Canadian Peace Institute:

- the time is right (start of a new millennium has caused re-evaluation; global Culture of Peace Program; global Hague Appeal for Peace Education Program; current Information Revolution and coming Spiritual Revolution)

- potential opportunity for a UNESCO/UPEACE Chair in the Culture of Peace, Democracy and Sustainable Development, geared towards the development of an international core curriculum and course

- real opportunity to link the creation of a Canadian Peace Institute with the Culture of Peace Program, and the establishment of a National Culture of Peace Program (reference http://www.peace.ca/copp.htm and the Proposed Action Plan for the Decade for a Culture of Peace tabled by the Nobel Laureates Foundation)

- there is an informational void, a leadership void, a resource void, and an educational void begging to be filled

- there is an opportunity to unify the peace movement (and programs) in Canada and realize related benefits

- tele-learning offers the opportunity for the creation of a virtual Canadian Peace Institute that would benefit from a nation-wide, and world-wide constituency

- service learning offers the opportunity to gain support from the local, national and international peace community (reference http://www.aahe.org/ )

- the opportunity of future financial viability (revenue generating activities include consulting, marketing peace products and services, etc.)

 TOP

4. THREATS

Identification of the threats found in the Canadian environment, that will throw up barriers to the development of a Canadian Peace Institute:

- different agendas: 'we have seen the enemy and it is us'. An analogy of the 80:20 rule in reverse: despite the fact that we agree about the importance of our goal of peace in our communities and world (the 80% of our like-mindedness), we let the details of each of our own beliefs and agendas keep us from working together effectively (the 20%).

- there is a culture and communications gap between business people, civil servants, academics and peace activists. In forming a Canadian Peace Institute Working Group, I recommended having someone on board with Conflict Resolution skills to help us to overcome our differences so that we could work together and accomplish our shared goal.

- current lack of unity among the peace community

- there is a cost to any action that must be rationalized and/or overcome (eg. the time and trouble to pursue this initiative; political and institutional reactions; does the benefit outweigh the cost sufficient to enable us to act?)

- lack of creativity (we will have to "think outside the box" to come up with a creative solution)

- lack of credibility (if we do not have the blessing of the Canadian government, and/or University accreditation/recognition)

- institutional barriers to education reform

- independence (financial, political, etc.)

- legal issues (copyright, slander, unions, etc.)

- tax issues (charitable institution for donation purposes, etc.)

 TOP

5. MAIN IDEAS FROM THE VISIONS, DIFFERENCES AND SIMILARITIES

Possibly most important, there seemed to be enough agreement on the need to pursue the idea of a Canadian Peace Institute to arrange a workshop in Hamilton September 29, 2000. Further, there was agreement on the importance of peace education at the centre of peacebuilding for a Culture of Peace.

Everyone seemed to be very similar and agreeable. For example, I believe that there seems to be consensus on the following (to name a few):

- there is a great need for a Canadian Peace Institute

- great opportunities exist, and there is real reason for optimism

- the lack of government (and other) support is appalling

- the approach should be holistic, inclusive, transdisciplinary, independent

- an endowment of $10,000,000 +/- would be a good thing, but money does not grow on trees

- need to be creative

- success rests upon delivering value for money

- incorporate service learning, activism, peace leadership

- incorporate peace at home and abroad (multi-level)

Differences of opinion have not been openly voiced yet. They may be anticipated in the following areas:

- the concept of a Virtual Canadian Peace Institute preceding a physical campus, and how it may work

- the viability of the Culture of Peace Program ("The 'appeal of the Nobelists' seemed to me, and a few others, exactly what we don't need.")

- program content ("Please let us ensure that whatever programmes a Canadian Peace Institute undertakes, hard science, law and economics are included. By that I mean: sociobiology (altruism and reciprocity theory); game theory (pace Rapaport); weapons systems and their control; arms trade and its control; legal theory; political theory; economic theory; social analysis. "Tough love" in fact.)

- future trends in peace education and education in general

- the involvement of non-academics

- the inclusion of peace at the individual, family, community and world level

- methods of raising funds

- resource sharing

- formation of education consortia

- location

- organization structure

- meditation, spirituality, religion, politics, etc.

 TOP

6. CONCLUSION

It is my observation that the following will be key to success of our Workshop on a Canadian Peace Institute:

- participants must leave their personal agenda's at the door: we are here to explore the creation of a Canadian Peace Institute, for the good of the world

- participants must be open minded and 'think outside the box'

- participants must practice conflict resolution skills to overcome communication gaps, differences of opinions/beliefs, taking sides, etc.

- participants must come prepared: we do not have a lot of time, but we have lots to accomplish; speeches should be kept short; print out and bring informational and background material as you require

- many hands make light work, and all of us are smarter than one of us: participants must be prepared to contribute

- participants must have a bias toward action

- participants should come prepared to serve on a working committee, should we proceed.

Comments, suggestions, etc. are welcome.

Respectfully submitted,

Robert Stewart, C.A., C.M.C.

stewartr [at] peace.ca

 


TOP

APPENDIX 1

POTENTIAL MARKET AND/OR CUSTOMERS/CLIENTS FOR A CANADIAN PEACE INSTITUTE

Dear Members,

As part of the dialogue and preparation leading up to a meeting September 29 (tentative) in Hamilton, I wish to solicit the following information and will post the resulting inventory on my web site at http://www.peace.ca/educationpartnerships.htm (where there are currently posted a growing number of visions - if you have not yet submitted yours, please do).

Consistent with a 'market driven approach' (also see footnote), I believe that we should have a list of the potential market and/or customers/clients for a Canadian Peace Institute ("CPI").

For example, I will list some institutional and other users below and suggest that the Canadian Peace Institute could (1) provide services to these institutions/clients, and (2) take in their students/people for training. Hand-in-hand with this, I think we should list the types of

employment opportunities (employers) that CPI students could look forward to.

I think it is timely to initiate this discussion and inventorying of the market. Some may say that we need to identify the scope of the CPI first, but I think it is a 'chicken or egg' situation. I think the purpose of the CPI is to help bring peace to the world (I will initiate a separate dialogue

on 'purpose of the CPI' shortly), but nevertheless to be successful it will have to be results oriented and market driven. Therefore, let's initiate the discussion now (there is little down-side).

I have a list on my web site of those Canadian institutions already offering a Peace and Conflict Studies Program ("PACS"): http://www.peace.ca/univandcollegespeacestudiesprog.htm . Something that will be needed but is a bigger job, is to match 'those already offering PACS' with the market opportunities identified, hence identifying the gaps that a CPI may fill. I would see this coming after the September meeting, but could currently be talked in general terms and identifying the major unfilled markets for the September meeting.

Please offer your suggestions of potential market demand that a Canadian Peace Institute could fill (if you wish, you can use the Appendix below as a form). I look forward to your responses (please post them to the CPREA listserv so everyone can see/participate).

Thanks,

Bob Stewart

http://www.peace.ca

==================================

APPENDIX

Sample list of the potential market and/or customers/clients for a Canadian Peace Institute:

In a university situation when a new program is proposed, someone would authorize a study of viability, polling both students and employers (and it would cost a lot of money). In this situation, for the meeting, it would make a lot of sense to make some contacts to have some idea of who would hire the grads, where, what, when, how and how much. Please be as specific

as possible in your contribution.

1. Canadian federal government (there are several departments, such as DFAIT, CIDA, foreign diplomats, DND, justice, corrections, health, social services),

2. Foreign governments (e.g.. China's Ministry of Education is planning a $43 million distance-education project to provide teacher training and degrees in the country's relatively undeveloped western region; there was a ten-year bilateral agreement to educate Indonesian faculty to int'l

standards, funded by CIDA)

3. Canadian provincial and municipal governments (teacher education, education systems development, police services, victims services, safe and caring cities, safe and caring schools; responding to real community needs as identified by the community)

4. research institutions,

5. the UN (including many UN agencies, UN Universities, University of Peace/Costa Rica)

6. private research services,

7. businesses (e.g.. international businesses vis international affairs, employee relations, public relations, conflict resolution/ADR)

8. non-government organizations (e.g.. CARE, Red Cross, religions, foreign NGOs; teaching leadership, fund-raising, etc.)

9. individuals (e.g.. target hardening courses, enlightenment seekers)

10. other

[Note - In Canada, we provide education as a basic right, so even if it "lost" money it would be worth doing, and in fact we are obligated to do so. Having said that, I stress to all my non-profit organization clients that unless you establish a sustainable source of funds you will not be

independent and will be at the mercy of the funder (you may have heard about the Golden Rule: "he who has the gold makes the rules"). I believe that it is possible to establish a sustainable source of funds for Peacebuilding and a Culture of Peace. I will stress the need to be entrepreneurial in approach, but I will not get into detail - that also is the subject of a longer planning session.}

 


TOP

 APPENDIX 2

PURPOSE OF A CANADIAN PEACE INSTITUTE

 

Dear Members,

Previously, this month, I have initiated dialogues on

(1) list of the potential market and/or customers/clients for a Canadian Peace Institute ("CPI"), and

(2) a draft agenda for our workshop/meeting.

As part of the continuing dialogue and preparation leading up to the meeting September 29 at McMaster University in Hamilton, I wish to solicit the following information and will post the resulting inventory on my web site at http://www.peace.ca/educationpartnerships.htm (where there are currently posted a growing number of visions - if you have not yet submitted yours,

please do).

I would like to explore (3) "the purpose of a Canadian Peace Institute". In the Appendix below, I attach some of my thoughts on this for example.

Please offer your suggestions of potential purpose of a Canadian Peace Institute. I look forward to your responses (please post them to the CPREA listserv so everyone can see/participate).

Thanks,

Bob Stewart

http://www.peace.ca

==================================

APPENDIX - PURPOSE OF A CANADIAN PEACE INSTITUTE ("CPI") [suggested by Bob

Stewart]

- to help bring peace to the world by:

1. being the pre-eminent peace university or school of higher peace learning in Canada

2. helping motivate, prepare and activate Canadians and others around the world to resolve peace problems, and in the process build a Culture of Peace and Non-violence

3. helping build peace education into our formal and informal education systems

4. helping fill the informational, educational and leadership void related to peace

5. offering a Masters Program in Peace

6. linking or networking the peace education and related programs in Canada at Universities, Colleges, schools, and elsewhere

7. providing leadership training and Peacebuilding capacity

8. encompassing the UNESCO Culture of Peace Program

9. 'selling' peace

10. providing training to teachers and consultants

11. providing a Peace Museum and Resource Centre

12. unifying the peace and related movements, organizations and individuals in Canada

13. promoting peace research and development

14. serving students by providing them with the best peace education and skills for employment in related areas (including the volunteer sector)

15. providing skilled students for potential employers in peace and related areas

[not necessarily listed in order of importance, and not necessarily

complete]

 


 TOP

APPENDIX 3

LEADERS IN PEACE EDUCATION

 

In preparing for my presentation at the CPREA conference, I have circulated the question on the CPREA list server, "I was wondering who the Members of the CPREA list server may consider to be leaders of peace education in Canada? Individuals and/or organizations? In order of importance, if you can advise me. "

In the course of only three days, I received three responses (from the pool of 65 Members on the listserv) who identified the following leaders in peace education:

Hanna Newcomb

Larry Fisk at MSVU and CPREA

DFAIT and Lloyd Axworthy

Coady International Institute

The Lester B. Pearson Canadian International Peacekeeping Training Centre

Network Interaction for Conflict Resolution's directory of links (at Conrad Grebel College)

Menno Simons College

Conrad Grebel College

Thomas Homer-Dixon

Jubilee 2000

Ecumenical Coalition for Economic Justice

Project Ploughshares

McMaster University Centre for Peace Studies

Science for Peace

Center for Social Justice

Peter Langille

Anne Adelson

Floyd Rudmin

MV Naidu

Roger Davies, Men for Change

Anatol Rapoport

Graeme MacQueen

Robert Stewart and Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace

 

Note: the only reason a leader in peace education is not on this list is because no one had put their name forward in the short time given (I did not compile a list of people that I thought should be there - I wished to see what others thought). I will add a caveat to the listing: it is only a list of names put forward, is subjective and debatable - It will be interesting to see how it and the discussion evolves.

 


TOP 

APPENDIX 4

MAIN IDEAS FROM THE VISIONS

I have taken the liberty of highlighting what I think are key ideas from the following author's visions. My apologies for oversimplifying their comments. The visions can be found in their entirety at http://www.peace.ca/educationpartnerships.htm

John Munro

- there is a dearth of post-secondary peace study/conflict resolution teaching and research in present day Canada

- broad public education on peace related matters is also at a low ebb in Canada

- the opportunity to make an important contribution to peace education and research exists

- harness the creative energies of our citizenry in common cause, and dialogue for peace

- It is significant that in what may be seen as the competition for the souls and minds of tomorrow's leaders, peace studies falter in Canadian universities for want of adequate financing, while programs in international relations, foreign policy, defence policy and strategic studies remain relatively well funded (as do the professional agendas of individual scholars in these fields).

- Unfortunately, our government, unlike a number in Europe, seems unlikely to provide financial support to programs designed to explode the myth that military establishments protect the societies on which they feed, or to suggest de-globalization as a partial solution to many of the problems afflicting today's world.

- Chrétien easily could have restored CIIPS (Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security) after his government came into power in November 1993. He chose not to.

- The door is open to any institution that would seize the opportunity to make a difference to PACS in Canada, at whatever level.

- The Canadian government's funding priorities seem skewed beyond belief. We have strategic studies to excess, but no military capability or concomitant power base of which to speak. Starving babies in Iraq, bombing civilians in Belgrade, warlordism in Somalia, slavery in the Sudan: nothing seems to elicit an impassioned public response.

- As long as we are alive, we have every reason to hope and work for a better world.

- the 50-point HAP Agenda is an ideal starting point for any new peace institution contemplating the development of a conference schedule

- proceed to explore further the creation of a Peace Academy

Anne Adelson

- a "big old house";

- provides conflict resolution training, research centre, a safe place, energy, information, dialogue;

- connected to university and community

- connections with TRANSEND, University of Peace in Costa Rica, Culture of Peace Program

Janet Hudgins

- "science of the studies of peace is (currently) not a bona fide vocation"

- masters degree

- other countries (cross) participation

- virtual peace university

- Canada has a very important role to play in bringing peace to the world

- We can well afford to establish a Canadian University of Peace, and we have a responsibility to our youth to do so, so that they can stand on our shoulders now and in generations to come.

Zlatko Isakovic

- multi-task; multi-topic; multi-disciplinary; multi-level

- consortium

- unify

- using existing infrastructure

- financial independence

- support capacity building and providing leadership for peace action

- it is time to act

- holistic

- international faculty

Floyd Rudmin (these are the comments in full as it is not available online)

- The success of a peace institute plan will require that it be compatible with the traditions and with the present and future fiscal realities of academia.

- A major priority should be on building an endowment fund, legally set up in a way that the money's cannot be diverted to other purposes. It takes about one million dollars to endow a professorship. Therefore, an endowment fund of 5 to 10 million dollars would assure into perpetuity that a department or a faculty could exist.

- Peace is a topic, not a discipline. That is, there are no methods of science or rhetoric that are unique to peace. One approach that might be possible is to design the academic program on the basis of a Liberal Arts degree in peace studies. The student would be required to take the intro courses in humanities, sciences, social sciences, languages, applied technology, education, etc., and then higher level courses in these disciplines, but have the higher level courses focussed on the topic of peace. So, peace engineering, peace economics, peace history, peace philosophy, peace lit, etc. The student would leave the program certified as a liberal arts graduate, meaning that they know the methods and foundations of most academic ways to knowledge, plus they would have specialization on the topic of peace.

Larry Fisk (Nigel Young)

- need to re-conceptualize peace research and education in light of rapidly evolving global situation

- none (i.e. institutions) covers the area broadly denoted by the term "peace culture"

- international input and output

- need to create an endowment of around US$10 - 12 million and to sustain from the proceeds

- draw from several cultures

- unique role of Canada

Royal Roads University (proposal)

- We know that the validity of new programs and their ultimate success rests upon the university's ability to ensure the value of the program to the field of prospective learners and support from key sectors and organizations.

- Our research indicates that, while there are many programs offered in these general topic areas by various Canadian and American universities, the areas of peacebuilding and human security merit further attention and elaboration.

- The emerging concepts of peacebuilding and human security as founded upon the uniting principles of civil society (encompassing the notions of good governance, civil administration, preventative diplomacy, civilian peacekeeping, and security of the individual) will be the references to guide the development of this new program. Peacebuilding seeks to enhance

the indigenous capacity of a society to manage conflict without violence and re-build societies in post-conflict situations.

- There is perceived potential for Canada to further demonstrate its peace and human security leadership through supporting this education program as the curriculum would be informed by and reflect the ideals and objectives of Canada's international and domestic social policy.

- the program curriculum would examine the basic threats to (peace) ... combine elements of safety and security of the individual as well as those issues related to security of the state ... strategies for achieving and maintaining conditions for the establishment and advancement of security will be proposed and examined ... seek to attain a balance between theory and practice ... the theory, as well as the process of peacebuilding, would be critically examined ... structures for support and maintenance of peace would be explored ... the program would be forward looking with a focus on contemporary and emerging issues

- this program would be unique in Canada and has the potential to make a valuable international contribution to this specialized and rapidly developing area of study

- internships and field placements

- Royal Roads realizes the contribution that other institutions can make to this program and is therefore committed to working in collaboration and partnerships with other universities in this regard. This cooperative endeavour could be in the form of shared courses, shared faculty, student supervision and cooperative program planning.

TRANSEND/NIFF

- The aim of NIFF is to promote the highest quality of research, building upon the TRANSCEND approach of Diagnosis - Prognosis - Therapy, combining clear and powerful critique with creative suggestions for what can be done.

- NIFF will be involved in direct peace action, both in the Nordic countries, and in cooperation with others internationally.

- time has come to make a new, fresh start with a new institute for peace research

- NIFF will promote peace by peaceful means by exploring and help enact nonviolent initiatives to defuse dangerous conflict formations (which are much broader than the conflict arenas the media and the governments/diplomats focus on).

- NIFF will work actively with peace movements and other NGOs that cannot be suspected of having hidden geopolitical/economic agendas, and develop ideas in dialogue with them.

- embodied two additional ideas or visions; first, that peace research must also develop outside and independent of these structures. Second, that at least some peace research must be useful to those hit by violence and inform its research by conducting empirical work in conflict regions. In short, research through engagement, not only through in-house academic exchanges and books.

- Sometimes the search and re-search has to imply that we re-start and re-think what it is we want to do as intellectuals-cum-activists.

Robert Stewart

- Providing direction and support towards the creation of a Canadian Peace Institute falls into CPREA's mandate

- What I found was an information void, a leadership void, a resource void, and an educational void.

- it is not because we don't know what to do. In fact, the Carnegie Commission on Resolving Deadly Conflict concluded, "It is not that we do not know what to do - it is that we do not act". http://www.ccpdc.org/

- if our leaders won't act then it is up to us - and that is where the Good News and opportunity is

- It is unconscionable that there is no pre-eminent peace university or school of higher peace learning in Canada. You can't even get a Masters degree in peace in Canada. You can't even learn the 'big picture' about peace in Canada.

- what I propose as a unique Canadian Peace Institute designed, not to navel gaze, but to help motivate, prepare and activate Canadians and others around the world to resolve peace problems, and in the process build a Culture of Peace and Non-violence for the Children of the World.

- a National Culture of Peace Program is the big picture solution to the peace problem. I have written an article on this, available on our web site at http://www.peace.ca/copp.htm . An overview of the big picture is available at http://www.peace.ca/appendixb.htm .

- the Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace has identified basic needs for peace education and established a successful methodology for serving those needs (reference http://www.peace.ca/Museum.htm )

- I would like to talk about the possibility of Canadian Universities, Colleges, Secondary, Elementary and Primary Schools becoming a part of a visionary new Canadian Peace Institute, including the promotion (research, development, education, etc.) of a National Culture of Peace Program and a network with Canadian (and foreign) universities (and other schools).

- plain language to communicate (outreach) to, and involve, the general public/grass roots (i.e. we wish to activate the 80% of people with positive outlooks towards peace and non-violence but who are currently inactive because they do not know what they can do to contribute, or are unmotivated; working at the community level; empowering citizens),

- It would incorporate the creation of a fund raising 'Peace Education Foundation', and teach peace groups how to fund raise,

- Within a year the peace leaders of this country could have a virtual Canadian Peace Institute established (at least initiated). Within 3 years we can have a bona fide, successful, Masters degree granting Institution that is the talk of the country. Within 5 to 10 years we can have that pre-eminent Canadian Peace Institute, respected throughout the world, of which each of your institutions can share in the success and accomplishments - and we will all profit from this, in ways much more important than dollars and cents.

TOP


Home | How You Can Make a Difference | Problem Identification Topics |
Proposals/Solutions | Information Resources | Who's Who | Upcoming Events
© 1998.  Permission to reprint is granted provided acknowledgment is made to:
The Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace
Last update:  10 Dec 2006