PEACE EDUCATION GAPS THAT REQUIRE FILLING (Draft for Discussion)

INTRODUCTION

This document has been drafted for discussion, initially identifying what may be perceived as gaps in peace education that should be filled to help advance a Culture of Peace Program in Canada.

Your input is requested - basically to identify University level peace courses that are required from the CCOPP perspective.  The message below is our first attempt to do this, to initiate some discussion amongst us.  As indicated in the notes at the end, one might see us workshopping this to better identify the courses needed and potential course content (what is provided is for example).   At the appropriate time, Universities and Colleges and other Educational Institutions will be invited to help fill the critical gaps in peace education for a Culture of Peace.


 

CANADIAN CULTURE OF PEACE PROGRAM

EDUCATIONAL GAPS THAT REQUIRE FILLING

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION - March 19, 2005

 

PURPOSE: What I found in doing an environmental scan of the peace industry in Canada and the world was an information void, a leadership void, a resource void, and an educational void preventing the building of a Culture of Peace and Non-violence.  Our purpose is to fill those key voids.  By default, one becomes "pre-eminent" by doing so (in other words, at this moment, it is not hard to become the expert when no one else is doing it).

 

THE “CENTRAL NODE” UNIVERSITY OF CCOPP

Suggested Mission: The University will use its abilities to advance a Culture of Peace and Non-violence, at home and abroad.

A. INSTITUTIONAL LEVEL

Institutional Levels considered:

Small Core Group/Steering Committee (Yahoo Group, dialogue, CCOPP ‘stewards’)

Larger Core Working Group (Yahoo Group, dialogue, directly active participants prepared to make an investment of time, skills and resources in the overall CCOPP, following Culture of Peace and Non-violence values; ref. http://ca.groups.yahoo.com/group/CCOPPcore ) (Announcements will be placed in the CCOPP Newsletter)

CCOPP Newsletter (Broadcast) (Yahoo Group, broadcast) (Newsletters will automatically be posted to all Groups, and anyone who wishes to subscribe; expect one or two per month)

CCOPP Dialogue – General (Yahoo Group, dialogue, inclusive)

 

Proposed Courses:

1. MacroPeace: the Big Peace Picture; conceptual mapping; action planning; Canadian Culture of Peace Handbook

Required texts -

- Introduction to Peace Studies http://www.peace.ca/peacefordummies.htm and http://www.peace.ca/introductiontopeacestudies.htm

Macropeace: 'The Big Picture'   http://www.peace.ca/macropeace.htm

- Proposed Canadian Peace Initiative Charter of Principles ( http://www.peace.ca/CPImission.htm  to start the dialogue, and your particular attention is drawn to the last section of the page for the proposed Charter)

- The Human Right to Peace, by Doug Roche.  See summary at http://www.peace.ca/humanrighttopeace.htm 

-At Home in the World: Canada 's Global Vision for the 21st Century, by Jennifer Welsh.  "In order for Canada to play a new part on the global stage in the 21st century, we need to shed some of the traditional myths that have dominated our international identity for the past half-century. We should conceive of Canada not in traditional terms, as a middle power, but as a citizen in the world of nation-states. In fact, I believe Canada has the potential to be a model citizen for the 21st century. Both words—"model" and "citizen"—are crucial to my vision. First, the notion of a model suggests a different approach to effecting change. A crucial aspect of Canadian foreign policy today is simply being what we are: a particular, and highly successful, model of liberal democracy."  See more detail at http://www.dfait-maeci.gc.ca/canada-magazine/01-title-en.asp

- The Best Country: Why Canada Will Lead the Future, by Satya Das.  Canadians are characteristically surprised when the United Nations consistently places Canada at or near the top of the list of its annual Human Development Index.  They shouldn't be. One of the world's most "spectacularly diverse nations", Canada has much to be proud of, and much to share with the rest of the world. This country is home to a tolerant, multicultural society; to a strong, developed democracy; and to a nation proud of its national and international accomplishments. In his newest book The Best Country - Why Canada Will Lead the Future, acclaimed author Satya Das makes a case for Canadian global leadership, sharing the best of itself with a world that seems to have lost its way. While recognizing Canada 's flaws and struggles, The Best Country argues the Canadian experience can be a role-model for the rest of the world. http://www.mastersandscribes.com/item667.htm   http://www.cambridgestrategies.com/

- Operationalizing a Canadian Culture of Peace Program http://www.peace.ca/CCOPPstatement2004.htm and related documents

- War and AntiWar: Making Sense of Today's Global Chaos. Author - Alvin and Heidi Toffler. Publisher - Warner Books, Inc. 1995. Rating - 5 Star.: Part 1. Conflict,
Part 2. Trajectory, Part 3. Exploration, Part 4. Knowledge, Part 5. Danger, Part 6. Peace

- "Peace Within Our Grasp" By Crandall R. Kline, Jr.  Finally, this book is available to order in quantities, in paperback, 300 total pages.  Order from peacedefense@sbcglobal.net , for $12 including postage.  The book will be mailed to you and you can pay by check when you receive it.  "Peace Within Our Grasp" is a comprehensive book that covers all (?) aspects of war prevention.  It is recommended for students because it is so comprehensive.  The Honorable John Seiberling, former Member of Congress and former Director, Center for Peace Studies wrote, "'Peace Within Our Grasp' does an excellent job of listing the elements that are needed for a peaceful world, both in moral thinking and in our political system.   It correctly calls for nonviolent efforts to be exhausted before resorting to violence.  It shows how built-in emotions can harmfully influence our decision making, and why some people are so easily persuaded to violence.  I recommend this book for all students of peace."  Does our present moral system -- our conventional wisdom, such as the Ten Commandments, the Golden Rule, and Just War Rules provide the right guidance for preventing wars and living peacefully?  Why was the United Nations ineffective in preventing the Korean War and the Gulf War?  Why is it that an entire (?) nation, at times, think that genocide is desirable, such as the Germans in World War II, the Turks in World War I, the Serbs in Bosnia and Kosovo, the Hutus in Rwanda?  Why is it that some Muslims embrace "killing for God" and subjugating women, such as the Taliban are doing, even though Islam forbids it?  We have had wars for thousands of years, and they continue despite all efforts to stop them.  Is this because some men have a built-in love of combat?  If so, what steps do we need to take to prevent wars?  "Peace Within Our Grasp" answers these questions in Chapters such as "Better Rules are the Solution", "Understanding Our Psychological Makeup", "Testosterone", "How the United Nations Should Be Revised", and "Sacreligion".   Additional Chapters are "What is Truth?" "Changing Public's Opinion", "The Role of Editors and Reporters", "A New World Order", "Sovereignty's Limits", "Nonlethal Weapons", and "A Peace Hall of Fame".  The book makes the point that men cannot be looked at as homogeneous; they need to be observed on a continuum, from pacifist to homicidal.  We hope you will be inspired to order a copy.  Volume purchases can be obtained at a 40% discount.  Crandall R. Kline, Jr.  BSME peacedefense@sbcglobal.net .  A summary of the book is available at How to Achieve World Peace http://www.peace.ca/worldpeace.htm 

- "A Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict" http://www.peace.ca/forcemorepowerful2.htm - Video.  It is six 30 minute segments showing how, during a century of extreme violence, millions chose to battle the forces of brutality and oppression with nonviolent weapons and won.  Click on the link to read about a special free offer from the publishers

- Nonviolence and the Ethics of Social Action, University of Colorado .  Here is a web site that profiles a peace course developed using the service learning model. This course is an examination of the phenomenon of nonviolence as a critical dynamic of social action and social change. Major emphases include: the origins of nonviolence and violence, the logic of nonviolence and the illogic of violence, theories and methods of nonviolence throughout history, contemporary applications of nonviolence, nonviolent conflict resolution, and the ethics of action intended to produce social change. Although the dominant perspective in the course is sociological, it is approached overall from an interdisciplinary perspective. Course objectives include familiarity with: the sociological phenomenon of nonviolence; theories of conflict, social change, power, and nonviolence; religious nonviolence and pacifism; secular nonviolence; the nonviolence of Henry David Thoreau, C. Mohandas K. Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr.; an historical overview of nonviolent conflicts; several case studies in nonviolence, including: Gandhian nonviolence in India, nonviolence in the United States - e.g., the civil rights and peace movements - nonviolent social change and transformation in Europe in the late 1980s; and prospects for nonviolent social change in the 21st century.   http://csf.colorado.edu/sl/syllabi/peace/crews2025-96.html

- acting as a clearing-house for an inventory of secondary programs in Culture Of Peace-type courses across the nation, which would be required in order to identify the gaps

 

2. Peace Leadership: Organizational, People and Change Management; Vision and Creative Peace Thinking; Problem Solving; Motivation (ties in to Peace Psychology below); building relationships with key stakeholders in building a Culture of Peace and Non-violence; Peace Marketing Strategy  

NEWBUTTONPINK.GIF (519 bytes)LEADERSHIP IN TRANSFORMATION OF THE PEACE PROFESSION - here is the basic curriculum for a semester course in Leadership and Peace, developed by Robert Stewart, C.A., C.M.C., September 2005.  This may be completed as a self-study course.  Modelled after the experiences of Canadian Centres for Teaching Peace and the Canadian Culture of Peace Program.
- download Powerpoint format
- download Microsoft Word format

Required texts -

The Peace Leader   http://www.peace.ca/peaceleader.htm

- Servant Leadership: A Journey into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness, by Robert K. Greenleaf http://www.peace.ca/servantleadership.htm

PEOPLE BUILDING PEACE - 35 INSPIRING STORIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD - The world is facing many conflicts today. Especially the humanitarian crisis and the political deadlock in Kosovo are at the forefront of our attention.   We can learn from the many mistakes made in Kosovo by attempting to ensure that meaningful conflict prevention strategies are identified and are actually pursued in other situations of latent conflict. One of the main messages of  'People Building Peace' is the urge to invest in preventative action in an early stage of conflict. Preventative action is not only necessary; this book also shows it is possible.  ' People Building Peace' tells the stories of the valuable initiatives taken by citizens of many countries   to prevent violence, to resolve conflict, and to reconcile parties that have been at war.  It shows the important role 'multi-track' diplomacy can play in conflict prevention and resolution: Churches, women's organisations, the media and non-governmental organisations have all demonstrated their potential for building peace.  The publication is intended to inspire people to invest in peace-building.  It is written with a broad audience in mind: (non-)governmental organisations, governments, educators, media, and all people working for peace.  With contributions of: FEDERICO MAYOR (Director-General UNESCO), PIERRE SCHORI (Minister for Development Affairs, Sweden), JOHN PAUL LEDERACH (Eastern Mennonite University), HIZKIAS ASSEFA (African Peace-building and Reconciliation Network), SEARCH FOR COMMON GROUND, THE INSTITUTE FOR MULTI-TRACK DIPLOMACY and many others.  ' People Building Peace' is a publication of the European Centre for Conflict Prevention in co-operation with International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR) and the Coexistence Initiative of the State of the World Forum.  For more information please contact: Paul van Tongeren, Executive director of the European Centre for Conflict Prevention, P.O. Box 14069 , 3508 SC Utrecht, Netherlands. Tel: +31 (0)30 253 75 28; Fax: +31 (0)30 253 75 29. Email: euconflict@euconflict.org ;   Web-site: http://www.euconflict.org

- The Peace Marketing Strategy: How to Sell Peace, by Bob Stewart and Paul Nelson (in development)

 

3. Peace Economics/Resource Management: Information Management, Human Resource Management, Financial Management, Time Management; Sustainable Peace Economics; Proposed Peace (Education) Foundation (i.e. vehicles for raising peace education resources;  Yahoo Group ref. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CCOPPresourceraising )

Required texts -  

BUDDHIST ECONOMICS by E. F. Schumacher http://www.schumachersociety.org/buddhisteconomics.html

- to come (I have to think about this, but I am sure I can pull something together from my wealth of information)

- how to raised funds

- The Peace Marketing Strategy: How to Sell Peace, by Bob Stewart and Paul Nelson (in development)

 

4. The Peace Functional Areas (or Other Root Causes): the Culture of Peace Program Action Areas and the Hague Appeal for Peace 50 (summary level course; ties in to the detailed courses/Action Areas devolved to other Universities and Colleges below; those detailed courses would flow information up to the summary level course)

Required texts -

- U.N. Culture of Peace and Non-violence Program Action Areas http://cpnn-usa.org/learn/values.html

- Hague Appeal for Peace Agenda http://www.haguepeace.org/html/agenda.htm

- Free Flow of Information   

5. Linking Peace at the Individual, Family, Community and World Levels: the Relationships (summary course, detailed courses below)

Required texts -

- Roots of Violence in the U.S. Culture: A Diagnosis Towards Healing - Author Alain Richard, Blue Dolphin Publishing, 1999; 156 pages; paperback; US$14.95; ISBN: 1-57733-043-9.  Click on this link for a summary of the highlights of the book. http://www.peace.ca/rootsofviolenceintheUS.htm  5 Star, Must Reading.  Roots of Violence exposes the origins and current causes of the underlying, explosive rage pervasive in our culture today, and being exported by the U.S. to the rest of the world.  Understanding this is the first step toward healing our society.

"Boys Will Be Boys: Breaking the Link between Masculinity and Violence". Miedzian, Myriam. Doubleday, 1991. This book provides statistically backed research explaining why 90%+ of our prisons are filled with men, why poor male youth are most likely to be causes or victims of violence, the links between men and war, sports and violence, TV and violence, and generally how our culture currently promotes violence in males. Rating - 5 star

UNESCO and a Culture of Peace - Promoting a Global Movement; 1997 / ISBN 92-3-103391-3 / Paperback / 143pp / $25.50  Since UNESCO launched its Culture of Peace Programme, it has helped mobilize people from all walks of life and from all continents to support the transformation from a culture of war and violence to a culture of peace. This monograph provides an in-depth report of their actions, showing that the desire to establish a durable culture of peace is a product of this particular moment in history and an appropriate vision for the future.

- The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power - One hundred and fifty years ago, the corporation was a relatively insignificant entity. Today, it is a vivid, dramatic and pervasive presence in all our lives. Like the Church, the Monarchy and the Communist Party in other times and places, the corporation is today’s dominant institution. But history humbles dominant institutions. All have been crushed, belittled or absorbed into some new order. The corporation is unlikely to be the first to defy history. In this complex and highly entertaining documentary, Mark Achbar, co-director of the influential and inventive MANUFACTURING CONSENT: NOAM CHOMSKY AND THE MEDIA, teams up with co-director Jennifer Abbott and writer Joel Bakan to examine the far-reaching repercussions of the corporation’s increasing preeminence. Based on Bakan’s book The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power, the film is a timely, critical inquiry that invites CEOs, whistle-blowers, brokers, gurus, spies, players, pawns and pundits on a graphic and engaging quest to reveal the 4corporation’s inner workings, curious history, controversial impacts and possible futures. Featuring illuminating interviews with Noam Chomsky, Michael Moore, Howard Zinn and many others, THE CORPORATION charts the spectacular rise of an institution aimed at achieving specific economic goals as it also recounts victories against this apparently invincible force.  5 Start Must Viewing.  http://www.thecorporation.com/ 

Bowling For Columbine.  Its a documentary film by Michael Moore, who is an American activist.  The film is a great demonstration of the attitudes and some of the causes of so much fear and death caused by guns in the US .  I think you should see it and maybe mention it on your website.  I think it is a film that everyone should see, although it is done tastefully some Americans of course may find it a little less amusing than us Canadians.  There was an American girl who went to the movie with us and she didn't appreciate it quite as much as us Canadians...who of course were used as better  examples of the US in terms of having a better living environment.  Did you know that in Canada we have approx 165 deaths per year from guns, while Germany has 255, and Great Britain has only 39.  The US has 11,124!!!!  A good quote from the movie is that "if safety was measured in terms of numbers of guns, the US would be the safest country in the world, but that's not how it works".  He also talks about stereotypes, racism, misconceptions/misinformation, fear and media's association with the problems of violence.  As soon as you get the chance, go see it...it is getting rave reviews.  Here is a site that tells you about the movie -  http://www.bowlingforcolumbine.com/flash-01.php .  Mike Moore's web site is at http://www.michaelmoore.com/ .  Review courtesy of Robyn Stewart.   Other comparably excellent videos by Michael Moore are: The Big One (about corporations without a conscience) and Roger and Me (also about corporations without a conscience).  Michael also has a two DVD set containing approximately 12 weekly half Hour shows called "The Awful Truth", speaking to a variety of important issues including the Death Penalty.  All 5-Star Must Viewing.

 

6. Building Relationships and Conflict Transformation: the Galtung Methodology; conflict transformation mechanisms in all communities 

Required texts -

- "Conflict Transformation by Peaceful Means" This course will provide participants with an understanding of the TRANSCEND method which is based on 40 years of research and practice. Conflicts can never really be completely "resolved" or made to disappear, but they can be transformed from being fought with violent means to being conducted by peaceful means. In that sense, conflicts can have a constructive function of helping bring about desirable change.  The course format will be highly interactive, with a combination of lectures, seminars, and facilitated discussions. Participants are invited to contribute case studies from their own experience.
Participants will learn: to analyze conflicts and design methods of intervention that help reduce violence; methods of mapping conflict formations; principles of dialogue and negotiation as methods of conflict transformation; the psychology of the dialogue process, and more.  Johan Galtung is Professor of Peace Studies and Director of TRANSCEND - A peace and Development Network. As founder of the International Peace Research Institute in 1959 and the Journal of Peace Research in 1964, Prof. Galtung is considered by many to be the key founding figure in the academic discipline of peace and conflict studies. He has published over 100 books and 1500 articles
and taught at countless universities worldwide. He is recipient of 10 honorary doctorates and numerous other honors such as the Right Livelihood Award (the Alternative Nobel Peace Prize), the Norwegian Humanist Prize, the Socrates Prize for Adult Education, the Bajaj International Award for Promoting Gandhian Values and the Alo'ha International Award.  He is engaged in consultative processes in over 50 current inter - and intra-national conflicts. Galtung is a renowned, dynamic speaker offering constructive advice in this time of global crisis.  TRANSCEND is a peace and development network of invited scholars-practitioners doing  action/training/research/ dissemination within 20 programs, based on 40 years experience. Reports and downloads are available at
www.transcend.org

Getting to Peace : Turning Conflict into Cooperation at Home, Work & in the World by William Ury.  5-Star Must Reading .  Format: Hardcover, 256 pages.  ISBN: 0670887587. Publisher: Viking Press. Pub. date: September 1999. Reviews Book Description A millennium manifesto for achieving peace at home, at work, in the community, and in the world from the co-author of the bestselling Getting to YES.  Almost twenty years ago, Getting to YES revolutionized the way we think about negotiation. Now, on the verge of the millennium, bestselling author William Ury tackles the most critical challenge facing all of us: getting to peace. In our rapidly-changing workplaces, stressed-out families, and violent world, we need cooperation more than ever and yet everywhere destructive conflict poisons our relationships and our communities. How can we learn to deal with our differences without going to war? Is it humanly possible?  In Getting to Peace, Ury challenges the fatalism that is so fashionable. Using new archaeological and anthropological evidence, he overturns old myths about human nature and offers a new and hopeful story about human conflict. He suggests a powerful new approach for turning conflict into cooperation which he calls the "Third Side." For in every dispute, there are not just two sides, but a silent third side that can help bring about agreement. By discovering the ten roles of the third side, each of us can act as teachers, healers, and mediators to achieve fair and non-violent conflict resolution. Our happiness at home, our productivity at work, and our very lives depend on Getting to Peace.  "Bill Ury has a remarkable ability to get to the heart of a dispute and find simple but innovative ways to resolve it."--President Jimmy Carter.  About the Author William L. Ury is one of the world's leading negotiation specialists. Co-founder of Harvard's Program on Negotiation, he has mediated situations ranging from corporate mergers to wild cat strikes in a Kentucky coalmine, and from family feuds to ethnic wars in Russia and the former Yugoslavia . His books Getting to YES (Penguin) (with Roger Fisher) and Getting Past No have together sold more than four million copies. Ury and his work have been featured in The New York Times, Newsweek and on ABC's Good Morning America. He received his BA from Yale and Ph.D. from Harvard in social anthropology. See a more detailed review, and link to www.Amazon.com  for ordering, at http://www.historyplace.com/pointsofview/ury.htm 

- "Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most", by the Harvard Negotiation Project.  Some quotes: "Returning from several years in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II, I discovered that my roommate, two of my closest friends, and dozens of classmates had been killed in the war.  Ever since, I have worked to improve the skills with which we deal with our differences; to improve the prospects for our children's future; and to enlist others in that cause."  "What makes these situations so hard to face?  It's our fear of the consequences -- whether we raise the issue or try to avoid it."  "The dilemma ... Why is it so difficult to decide whether to avoid or to confront?  Because at some level we know the truth - If we try to avoid the problem, we'll feel taken advantage of, our feelings will fester, we'll wonder why we don't stick up for ourselves, and we'll rob the other person of the opportunity to improve things.  But if we confront the problem, things might get even worse.  We may be rejected or attacked; we might hurt the other person in ways we didn't intend; and the relationship might suffer."  "Delivering a difficult message is like throwing a hand grenade.  Coated with sugar, thrown hard or soft, a hand grenade is still going to do damage. Try as you may, there's no way to throw a hand grenade with tact or to outrun its consequences.  And keeping it to yourself is no better.  Choosing
not to deliver a difficult message is like hanging on to a hand grenade once you've pulled the pin.  So we feel stuck.  We need advice that is more powerful than "Be diplomatic" or "Try to stay positive".  The problems run deeper than that; so must the answers."  "... learning conversations ... people who have learned new approaches to dealing with their most challenging conversations report less anxiety and greater effectiveness in all of their conversations ... dealing constructively with tough topics and awkward situations strengthens a relationship."  "At heart, the problem isn't in your actions, it's in your thinking."  You can buy the book for $11.20 at http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/014028852X/002-6059897-9091241?v=glance  .  To increase our chances of achieving a successful conversation we must have a good strategy.  Here are some general tips from the above book:
1. having a purpose (what is the point and what does a good outcome look like?; three purposes that work: learning their story, expressing your views and feelings, and problem-solving together)
2. remember that we can not change or control other people (we can have influence, and engaging someone in a conversation where mutual learning is the goal often results in change)
3. letting go of past issues (grievances, losses) and working together from a basis of current commonalities, strengths and assets to build a better future
4. engaging in nonviolent communication (eg. do not "poke the other person in the eye" ;-); otherwise they get defensive and/or offensive (and blind to us ;-) (for information on compassionate communication, refer to http://www.bcncc.org/  )
5. realizing all parties to the conversation are not perfect (we all see the world differently, we all have powerful feelings, and we each have our own identity issues to work through; in short, we each have our own story, and our own picture of peace)
6. think like a mediator (identify the Third Side, or Third Story; the key is learning to describe the gap or difference between our stories, then working to try to close it, which may take movement by all parties)
7. turn it into a learning conversation: describe the problem in a way both sides can accept, propose mutual understanding and problem-solving as purposes, check with others to see if this makes sense, and invite others to join the conversation (make them your partner in figuring it out; those that do not wish to participate can opt-out).  Provide some relevant background reading that might help open minds.
8. listen to understand; ask open-ended questions; ask for more information; respect others; create a safe environment for dialogue
9. think and strategize before you speak; don't cross-examine; don't blame; don't take away from the other person; paraphrase for clarity, to show that you heard, and check your understanding; acknowledge their feelings; empathize; speak from the heart, start with what matters most and say what you mean; don't exaggerate, generalize or stereotype; be humble (having humility does not mean allowing others to "walk all over you")
10. It is up to each of us to find our own truth (i.e. my truth is not necessarily your truth; you should not simply accept what I say: you have to do your own "homework")
11. identify the issues and problems from all perspectives; make the "trouble" explicit; find out where there is agreement and disagreement, and why; then begin to problem-solve: brainstorm with all affected parties, invent options, ask what standards should apply, consider alternatives
12. have patience: it takes time
13. rehearse the conversation in your mind before starting (have preparation notes; think things through)
14. appreciate the diversity of thoughts and ideas
15. sometimes we have to agree to disagree, with all due respect
16. thank the parties for their participation (it will take a lot of effort, and hopefully it is worthwhile)
I look forward to your thoughts and additional suggestions on this.  I am most interested because peacebuilders and peace educators are always having a difficult conversation.  I am hopeful that we can develop a model for peacebuilding to help us work through the various difficult conversations that must take place.
  Click here to see an excellent 19 page summary of the book.  5 Star Must Reading.

- Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High, by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Switzler.  Format: Paperback, 256pp. ISBN: 0071401946. Publisher: McGraw-Hill Trade. Pub. Date: June 2002. Retail price US$16.95. If you liked the book "Difficult Converations", you will love "Crucial Conversations".  5-Star Recommended/Must Reading .  A powerful, seven-step approach to handling difficult conversations with confidence and skill.  "Crucial" conversations are interpersonal exchanges at work or at home that we dread having but know we cannot avoid. How do you say what needs to be said while avoiding an argument with a boss, child, or relationship partner? Crucial Conversations offers readers a proven seven-point strategy for achieving their goals in all those emotionally, psychologically, or legally charged situations that can arise in their professional and personal lives. Based on the authors' highly popular DialogueSmart training seminars, the techniques are geared toward getting people to lower their defenses, creating mutual respect and understanding, increasing emotional safety, and encouraging freedom of expression. Among other things, readers also learn about the four main factors that characterize crucial conversations, and they get a powerful six-minute mastery technique that prepares them to work through any high impact situation with confidence. Learn how to keep your cool and get what you want when emotions flare. When stakes are high, opinions vary, and emotions run strong, you have three choices: Avoid a crucial conversation and suffer the consequences; handle the conversation badly and suffer the consequences; or read Crucial Conversations and discover how to communicate best when it matters most. This wise and witty guide gives you the tools you need to step up to life's most difficult and important conversations, say what's on your mind, and achieve positive outcomes that will amaze you. You'll learn how to:

Whether they take place at work or at home, with your neighbors or your spouse, crucial conversations can have a profound impact on your career, your happiness, and your future. With the skills you learn in this book, you'll never have to worry about the outcome of a crucial conversation again.  Read Chapter 1 at http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadershop/0194-6excerpt.html  .  Click here to see an excellent 20 page summary of the book.  5 Star Must Reading.

- Crucial Confrontations: Tools for Resolving Broken Promises, Violated Expectations, and Bad Behavior,  by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Switzler.  Format: Paperback, 272pp. ISBN: 0-07-144652-4. Publisher: McGraw-Hill Trade. Pub. Date: January 2005. Retail price US$16.95.  This 5-Star Recommended/Must Reading builds on Difficult Conversations and Crucial Conversations.  The difference - the hallmark of a crucial conversation is disagreement, while crucial confrontations are about disappointments.  Confrontations comprise the very foundation of accountability.  They all start with the question: "Why didn't you do what you were supposed to do?"  And they only end when a solution is reached and both parties are motivated and able to comply.  Confrontations are the prickly, complicated, and often frightening performance discussions that keep you up nights.  We will need these skills for conducting the 8 Crucial Canadian Conversations noted below.  Click here to see 2 page Training Overview.  here's the forward and 1st chapter in pdf.  Click here to see an excellent 18 page summary of the book online. 5 star must read.  

NEWBUTTONPINK.GIF (519 bytes)- Social Intelligence: The New Science of Success; Beyond IQ, Beyond EI, Applying Multiple Intelligence Theory to Human Interaction, by Karl Albrecht http://www.karlalbrecht.com .  Format: Hardcover, 280pp.  ISBN: 0787979384.  October 2005.  Jossey-Bass.  When I developed the Draft Canadian Culture of Peace Program Marketing Strategy (ref. http://www.cultureofpeace.ca/CCOPPmarketingstrategy.htm ) , I suggested we use the concept of Social Intelligence (i.e. raising Social Intelligence/Social Development) as a path to Peace Education and a Culture of Peace – that it is more readily acceptable/ understandable by the general population.  This book explains it much better than I, including the “How To”, hence I strongly recommend it. Karl Albrecht defines social intelligence (SI) as the ability to get along well with others while winning their cooperation. SI is a combination of sensitivity to the needs and interests of others, sometimes called your “ social radar, ” an attitude of generosity and consideration, and a set of practical skills for interacting successfully with people in any setting. "Social Intelligence provides a highly accessible and comprehensive model for describing, assessing, and developing social intelligence at a personal level. This book is filled with intriguing concepts, enlightening examples, stories, cases, situational strategies, and a self-assessment tool – all designed to help you learn to navigate social situations more successfully.  The author takes you on a guided tour of the five dimensions of social intelligence (“S.P.A.C.E.”): 1. Situational Awareness – the ability to read situations and to interpret the behaviors of people in those situations;  2. Presence – Often called ‘bearing’, it’s a whole range of verbal and nonverbal behaviors that define you in the minds of others;  3. Authenticity – the behaviors that cause others to judge you as honest, open, and ‘real’;  4. Clarity – the ability to explain your ideas and articulate your views;  5. Empathy – the ability to ‘connect’ with others.  You can get it (and read a descriptive summary) at Chapters book store online at http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/item.asp?Item=978078797938&Catalog=Books&Ntt=social+intelligence&N=35&Lang=en&Section=books&zxac=1 for $21.43 (which is 33% off the list price right now).  5 star must reading.   Click here to read detailed highlights of the book.

- Cialdini, Robert B. - Influence: Science and Practice, Fourth Edition. Allyn & Bacon: 2001 - Chapter by chapter topic summary. This book outlines the categories, uses, tools, and techniques of 'influence' and how to recognize them. This book is a useful tool for understanding the science behind 'influence'. 

- Learning in Relationship: Foundation for Personal and Professional Success, by Ron Short, 1998. Learning in relationship is “about how to learn from others who have different perspectives”.    Click here to see an excellent 13 page summary of the book.  5 Star Must Reading.

- The Practice of Peace - I am almost done reading Harrison Owen's book "The Practice of Peace".  I wish to tell you about this because I see another convergence between the comments that the peacebuilding happens during the process of working on projects (for example), and using the Open Space conferencing in the process.  Owen is the leader behind Open Space Technology.  Open Space Technology or methodology of conferencing is very complimentary to what we have come around to thinking in terms of Servant Leadership style, non-hierarchical organizing, and the principles contained in the draft Charter (borrowed from the World Social Forum).  I have come to believe (an "aha" moment) that essentially the Canadian Peace Initiative may be as simple as providing venues or "Open Spaces to Open Minds to Peace".  (Another "reality check" -- It has been my personal view that I saw my contribution as simply providing venues where peace educators and peace builders could come together to dialogue, network, disseminate information, plan, etc. - in a sense, I/we have been doing Open Space for the past 3 years + without realizing it, through our conferences, my web site, our email listservers, etc.)  What Harrison Owen is saying is, "do not worry about spending a lot of time organizing an agenda.  Just provide an Open Space, have a general theme(s), invite people with a passion to come, the conference will organize itself based on what these passionate people really want to discuss".  He confirms what I think many of our participants have said at the last National Peace Education Conference -- that our best time was in the personal chats outside the presentations.  Harrison puts it much better than I.  You can read (and I highly recommend it to you) the 146 page book on the Internet at  Practice of Peace, Chapters 1,2    Practice of Peace, Chapters 2,4    Practice of Peace, Chapters 5,6,    Practice of Peace, Chapters 7,8Practice of Peace, Chapters 9,10 .  (the only thing is, the Internet version is missing about 4 pages - but it doesn't really matter).  Alternatively, you can order your own copy from the Open Space Institute of Canada in Quebec , by printing an order form off the Internet at http://www.openspacecanada.org/books.htm  and mailing it with a cheque (but it may take 3 weeks to turn around).  Suggestion: do all your group work as a series of Open Space conferencing.  In Owen's words, it will be self-organizing (which coincidentally takes a lot of stress off you).  You may well think that I have gone a bit crazy with this Open Space stuff.  However, I feel it is right for us, for what we have been working on, for the peace constituents, and for these times.  Open Space has all the features of a Culture of Peace (eg. democratic participation, respect, listening to understand, etc.)    Click on this link to read Highlights of the Book.  http://www.peace.ca/openspace.htm    

- case studies conducting 8 Crucial Canadian Conversations: 

  1. the Canada/United States relationship, (eg. reference http://www.peace.ca/canusa.htm )

  2. the Canada/United Nations relationship, (eg. reference http://www.peace.ca/un.htm )

  3. the Anglophone/Francophone relationship in Canada,

  4. the male/female relationship in Canada, 

  5. the aboriginal/non-aboriginal relationship in Canada, (eg. reference http://www.worldviewstrategies.com ), 

  6. the business/community relationship in Canada, (eg. reference http://www.peace.ca/itsgoodbusiness.htm ),

  7. the military/community relationship in Canada. (eg. reference http://www.peace.ca/militaryfunding.htm ), 

  8. the Government/community relationship in Canada (i.e. conversations with the federal government, provincial, and municipal governments to advance the Culture of Peace and Non-violence Program in Canada ; some municipal governments are making significant progress already, such as the City of Vancouver that has a Peace Committee)

.    

7. What is Wrong With the World?  A special study of the most serious issues facing mankind and the planet, and potential solutions and action plans.

Required texts:

The Millennium Project and 'The Fifteen Global Challenges' (go to http://www.acunu.org/ for the Millennium project generally; http://www.acunu.org/millennium/chal-prot.html#15%20Global specifically for the 15 Global Challenges; and the interactive site of the Executive Summary of the 15 Challenges at http://www.acunu.org/millennium/chal-prot.html ). 

BUDDHIST ECONOMICS by E. F. Schumacher http://www.schumachersociety.org/buddhisteconomics.html


 

UNIVERSITY B

Suggested Mission : The University will use its abilities to advance a Culture of Peace and Non-violence, at home and abroad, by advancing peace education.

 

B. CULTURE OF PEACE AND NON-VIOLENCE ACTION AREAS (the sub-components are derived from the Agenda of the Hague Appeal for Peace, reference http://www.peace.ca/agendaofthehague.htm , are not necessarily all-inclusive, and will evolve over time)

 

[Note - the University of Calgary has initiated a program where it goes to major related employers asking what type of skills they require and seeking hiring commitments, then designing approved courses to fit the employment need.  This tactic should be considered in developing the courses below.]

 

Proposed Courses:

1. Comprehensive Peace Education: How; What; Peace Informatics; Praxis/Service Learning;  Canadian Peace Education Handbook  

Required texts -

Hague Appeal for Peace & Global Campaign for Peace Education http://www.peace.ca/globalcampaignforpeaceeducation.htm

- UNESCO peace education initiatives

"Advancing the Peace Education Action Plan: Who, What, Where, When and How?"  The Executive Summary Vision and Action Plan from our 2002 Peace Education Conference in Canada . http://www.peace.ca/conference2002summary.htm

- Inventory of Peace Education in Canada http://www.peace.ca/canpeaceeducation.htm

- Peace curricula http://www.peace.ca/curricula.htm

"Modelling Education in a Culture of Peace" http://www.peace.ca/modellingpeaceeducation.htm (overview, detailed course below)

- models of peace education in practice, including the Montessori Method, Rudolph Steiner's Waldorf Schools , etc. (overview, detailed course below)

- 'Pedagogy of the Oppressed', by Paulo Friere (available online at http://www.marxists.org/subject/education/freire/pedagogy/ ; reviews at http://fcis.oise.utoronto.ca/~daniel_schugurensky/freire/opp.htm )

- 'Deschooling Society' by Ivan Illich (available online at http://www.ecotopia.com/webpress/deschooling.htm ) and "Tools for Conviviality" by Ivan Illich (available online at http://homepage.mac.com/tinapple/illich/1973_tools_for_convivality.html )

- 'Comprehensive Peace Education', by Betty Reardon

- "Open Space to Open Minds to Peace": the use of Open Space Technology in conferencing and dialogue http://www.peace.ca/ost.htm

- development of a comprehensive library of peace education resources (books, videos, etc.)

 

2. Peace Psychology: People and Relationship Building

Required texts -

- American Psychological Association (APA) Division 48 has sponsored development of the first college textbook on peace psychology (all proceeds are donated to the division).  "Peace, Conflict, and Violence: Peace Psychology for the 21st Century" edited by D. Christie, R. Wagner, and D. Winter (2001) is now available from Prentice Hall. The book is a 426 page paperback, very attractively packaged. If you teach at the college level, this may be the perfect text for your peace psychology or conflict and violence course. Knowing that an excellent text is available, some of you may now want to develop the first peace psychology course for your college. 5 Star Must Reading   Click on the link to Peace Psychology to read an excellent summary and ordering information. http://www.peace.ca/peacepsychology.htm ]

- Psychology for Peace Activists by David Adams, Printed by Advocate Press, New Haven CT , 1987. 37(+) pages. Introduction by David Adams: I believe that history is made by people like you and me. That means that "peace is in our hands", which was the slogan of the International Year for the Culture of Peace (2000). To learn how this could be possible, I undertook the study presented here in Psychology for Peace Activists which examines the lives of great peace activists, based primarily on their own autobiographies. Being American, I chose to study activists from American history. This was later expanded to include the important example of Nelson Mandela from South Africa . From this, I draw the conclusion that while the task is difficult, it is also possible, and we have much to learn from those who have gone before us. For this reason, I have sometimes given this little book the sub-title of "A New Psychology for the Generation Who Can Abolish War." Available online at http://www.culture-of-peace.info/ppa/title-page.html 

- Peace Psychology Links at http://www.socialpsychology.org/peace.htm

- 'Influence: Science and Practice' by Robert Cialdini

'Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do' by B.J. Fogg

Manufacturing Consent: Noam Chomsky and the Media.  Part 1 Thought Control in a Democratic Society; Part 2 Activating Dissent.  Highlighting Noam Chomsky's analysis of the media, Manufacturing Consent focuses on democratic societies where populations not disciplined by force are subjected to more subtle forms of ideological control.  Shocking examples of media deception (including an expose on East Timor ) permeate Chomsky's critique of the forces at work behind the daily news.  Chomsky encourages his listeners to extricate themselves from this "web of deceit" by undertaking a course of "intellectual self-defence".  Available from the National Film Board Order #C9192072; ISBN: 0-7720-464-0.  For distribution telephone 514-844-3358.  'Must see' rating.

 

3. Peace Education for Educators: Teaching Peace Education Methods and Practice to Teachers

Required texts -

"Modelling Education in a Culture of Peace" http://www.peace.ca/modellingpeaceeducation.htm (detailed course)

- models of peace education in practice, including the Montessori Method http://www.peace.ca/montessorisites.htm , Rudolph Steiner's Waldorf Schools , etc. (detailed course)

- use of Open Space Technology in the classroom http://www.peace.ca/ost.htm

- The Practice of Peace by Harrison Owen.  I wish to tell you about this because I see another convergence between the comments that the peacebuilding happens during the process of working on projects (for example), and using the Open Space conferencing in the process.  Owen is the leader behind Open Space Technology.  Open Space Technology or methodology of conferencing is very complimentary to what we have come around to thinking in terms of Servant Leadership style, non-hierarchical organizing, and the principles contained in the draft Charter (borrowed from the World Social Forum).  I have come to believe (an "aha" moment) that essentially the Canadian Peace Initiative may be as simple as providing venues or "Open Spaces to Open Minds to Peace".  (Another "reality check" -- It has been my personal view that I saw my contribution as simply providing venues where peace educators and peace builders could come together to dialogue, network, disseminate information, plan, etc. - in a sense, I/we have been doing Open Space for the past 3 years + without realizing it, through our conferences, my web site, our email listservers, etc.)  What Harrison Owen is saying is, "do not worry about spending a lot of time organizing an agenda.  Just provide an Open Space, have a general theme(s), invite people with a passion to come, the conference will organize itself based on what these passionate people really want to discuss".  He confirms what I think many of our participants have said at the last National Peace Education Conference -- that our best time was in the personal chats outside the presentations.  Harrison puts it much better than I.  You can read (and I highly recommend it to you) the 146 page book on the Internet at  Practice of Peace, Chapters 1,2    Practice of Peace, Chapters 2,4    Practice of Peace, Chapters 5,6,    Practice of Peace, Chapters 7,8Practice of Peace, Chapters 9,10 .  (the only thing is, the Internet version is missing about 4 pages - but it doesn't really matter).  Alternatively, you can order your own copy from the Open Space Institute of Canada in Quebec , by printing an order form off the Internet at http://www.openspacecanada.org/books.htm  and mailing it with a cheque (but it may take 3 weeks to turn around).  Suggestion: do all your group work as a series of Open Space conferencing.  In Owen's words, it will be self-organizing (which coincidentally takes a lot of stress off you).  You may well think that I have gone a bit crazy with this Open Space stuff.  However, I feel it is right for us, for what we have been working on, for the peace constituents, and for these times.  Open Space has all the features of a Culture of Peace (eg. democratic participation, respect, listening to understand, etc.)    Click on this link to read Highlights of the Book.  http://www.peace.ca/openspace.htm 

 

4. Peace Education at the Individual Level; How to build peace at the individual level

Required texts -

- living on purpose; personal goal setting; independence; critical thinking; conflict transformation; media literacy; the human/spiritual revolution

- everyone is a leader, educator, conflict transformer (how to)

- target hardening courses (eg. relationship violence prevention programs)

- "Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most", by the Harvard Negotiation Project.  Some quotes: "Returning from several years in the U.S. Army Air Force during World War II, I discovered that my roommate, two of my closest friends, and dozens of classmates had been killed in the war.  Ever since, I have worked to improve the skills with which we deal with our differences; to improve the prospects for our children's future; and to enlist others in that cause."  "What makes these situations so hard to face?  It's our fear of the consequences -- whether we raise the issue or try to avoid it."  "The dilemma ... Why is it so difficult to decide whether to avoid or to confront?  Because at some level we know the truth - If we try to avoid the problem, we'll feel taken advantage of, our feelings will fester, we'll wonder why we don't stick up for ourselves, and we'll rob the other person of the opportunity to improve things.  But if we confront the problem, things might get even worse.  We may be rejected or attacked; we might hurt the other person in ways we didn't intend; and the relationship might suffer."  "Delivering a difficult message is like throwing a hand grenade.  Coated with sugar, thrown hard or soft, a hand grenade is still going to do damage. Try as you may, there's no way to throw a hand grenade with tact or to outrun its consequences.  And keeping it to yourself is no better.  Choosing
not to deliver a difficult message is like hanging on to a hand grenade once you've pulled the pin.  So we feel stuck.  We need advice that is more powerful than "Be diplomatic" or "Try to stay positive".  The problems run deeper than that; so must the answers."  "... learning conversations ... people who have learned new approaches to dealing with their most challenging conversations report less anxiety and greater effectiveness in all of their conversations ... dealing constructively with tough topics and awkward situations strengthens a relationship."  "At heart, the problem isn't in your actions, it's in your thinking."  You can buy the book for $11.20 at
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/014028852X/002-6059897-9091241?v=glance  .  To increase our chances of achieving a successful conversation we must have a good strategy.  Here are some general tips from the above book:
1. having a purpose (what is the point and what does a good outcome look like?; three purposes that work: learning their story, expressing your views and feelings, and problem-solving together)
2. remember that we can not change or control other people (we can have influence, and engaging someone in a conversation where mutual learning is the goal often results in change)
3. letting go of past issues (grievances, losses) and working together from a basis of current commonalities, strengths and assets to build a better future
4. engaging in nonviolent communication (eg. do not "poke the other person in the eye" ;-); otherwise they get defensive and/or offensive (and blind to us ;-) (for information on compassionate communication, refer to
http://www.bcncc.org/  )
5. realizing all parties to the conversation are not perfect (we all see the world differently, we all have powerful feelings, and we each have our own identity issues to work through; in short, we each have our own story, and our own picture of peace)
6. think like a mediator (identify the Third Side, or Third Story; the key is learning to describe the gap or difference between our stories, then working to try to close it, which may take movement by all parties)
7. turn it into a learning conversation: describe the problem in a way both sides can accept, propose mutual understanding and problem-solving as purposes, check with others to see if this makes sense, and invite others to join the conversation (make them your partner in figuring it out; those that do not wish to participate can opt-out).  Provide some relevant background reading that might help open minds.
8. listen to understand; ask open-ended questions; ask for more information; respect others; create a safe environment for dialogue
9. think and strategize before you speak; don't cross-examine; don't blame; don't take away from the other person; paraphrase for clarity, to show that you heard, and check your understanding; acknowledge their feelings; empathize; speak from the heart, start with what matters most and say what you mean; don't exaggerate, generalize or stereotype; be humble (having humility does not mean allowing others to "walk all over you")
10. It is up to each of us to find our own truth (i.e. my truth is not necessarily your truth; you should not simply accept what I say: you have to do your own "homework")
11. identify the issues and problems from all perspectives; make the "trouble" explicit; find out where there is agreement and disagreement, and why; then begin to problem-solve: brainstorm with all affected parties, invent options, ask what standards should apply, consider alternatives
12. have patience: it takes time
13. rehearse the conversation in your mind before starting (have preparation notes; think things through)
14. appreciate the diversity of thoughts and ideas
15. sometimes we have to agree to disagree, with all due respect
16. thank the parties for their participation (it will take a lot of effort, and hopefully it is worthwhile)
I look forward to your thoughts and additional suggestions on this.  I am most interested because peacebuilders and peace educators are always having a difficult conversation.  I am hopeful that we can develop a model for peacebuilding to help us work through the various difficult conversations that must take place.

- Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High, by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Switzler.  Format: Paperback, 256pp. ISBN: 0071401946. Publisher: McGraw-Hill Trade. Pub. Date: June 2002. Retail price US$16.95.  A powerful, seven-step approach to handling difficult conversations with confidence and skill.  "Crucial" conversations are interpersonal exchanges at work or at home that we dread having but know we cannot avoid. How do you say what needs to be said while avoiding an argument with a boss, child, or relationship partner? Crucial Conversations offers readers a proven seven-point strategy for achieving their goals in all those emotionally, psychologically, or legally charged situations that can arise in their professional and personal lives. Based on the authors' highly popular DialogueSmart training seminars, the techniques are geared toward getting people to lower their defenses, creating mutual respect and understanding, increasing emotional safety, and encouraging freedom of expression. Among other things, readers also learn about the four main factors that characterize crucial conversations, and they get a powerful six-minute mastery technique that prepares them to work through any highimpact situation with confidence. Learn how to keep your cool and get what you want when emotions flare. When stakes are high, opinions vary, and emotions run strong, you have three choices: Avoid a crucial conversation and suffer the consequences; handle the conversation badly and suffer the consequences; or read Crucial Conversations and discover how to communicate best when it matters most. This wise and witty guide gives you the tools you need to step up to life's most difficult and important conversations, say what's on your mind, and achieve positive outcomes that will amaze you. You'll learn how to:  Prepare for high-impact situations with a six-minute mastery technique; Make it safe to talk about almost anything;  Be persuasive, not abrasive;  Keep listening when others blow up or clam up;  Turn crucial conversations into the action and results you want.  Whether they take place at work or at home, with your neighbors or your spouse, crucial conversations can have a profound impact on your career, your happiness, and your future. With the skills you learn in this book, you'll never have to worry about the outcome of a crucial conversation again.  Read Chapter 1 at http://www.leadershipnow.com/leadershop/0194-6excerpt.html .   If you liked the book "Difficult Converations", you will love "Crucial Conversations".  5-Star Recommended/Must Reading .

 

- Crucial Confrontations: Tools for Resolving Broken Promises, Violated Expectations, and Bad Behavior,  by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan and Al Switzler.  Format: Paperback, 272pp. ISBN: 0-07-144652-4. Publisher: McGraw-Hill Trade. Pub. Date: January 2005. Retail price US$16.95.  This 5-Star Recommended/Must Reading builds on Difficult Conversations and Crucial Conversations.  The difference - the hallmark of a crucial conversation is disagreement, while crucial confrontations are about disappointments.  Confrontations comprise the very foundation of accountability.  They all start with the question: "Why didn't you do what you were supposed to do?"  And they only end when a solution is reached and both parties are motivated and able to comply.  Confrontations are the prickly, complicated, and often frightening performance discussions that keep you up nights.  We will need these skills for conducting the 8 Crucial Canadian Conversations noted below.  Click here to see 2 page Training Overview.  here's the forward and 1st chapter in pdf.  Click here to see an excellent 18 page summary of the book online. 5 star must read.  

NEWBUTTONPINK.GIF (519 bytes)- Social Intelligence: The New Science of Success; Beyond IQ, Beyond EI, Applying Multiple Intelligence Theory to Human Interaction, by Karl Albrecht http://www.karlalbrecht.com .  Format: Hardcover, 280pp.  ISBN: 0787979384.  October 2005.  Jossey-Bass.  When I developed the Draft Canadian Culture of Peace Program Marketing Strategy (ref. http://www.cultureofpeace.ca/CCOPPmarketingstrategy.htm ) , I suggested we use the concept of Social Intelligence (i.e. raising Social Intelligence/Social Development) as a path to Peace Education and a Culture of Peace – that it is more readily acceptable/ understandable by the general population.  This book explains it much better than I, including the “How To”, hence I strongly recommend it. Karl Albrecht defines social intelligence (SI) as the ability to get along well with others while winning their cooperation. SI is a combination of sensitivity to the needs and interests of others, sometimes called your “ social radar, ” an attitude of generosity and consideration, and a set of practical skills for interacting successfully with people in any setting. "Social Intelligence provides a highly accessible and comprehensive model for describing, assessing, and developing social intelligence at a personal level. This book is filled with intriguing concepts, enlightening examples, stories, cases, situational strategies, and a self-assessment tool – all designed to help you learn to navigate social situations more successfully.  The author takes you on a guided tour of the five dimensions of social intelligence (“S.P.A.C.E.”): 1. Situational Awareness – the ability to read situations and to interpret the behaviors of people in those situations;  2. Presence – Often called ‘bearing’, it’s a whole range of verbal and nonverbal behaviors that define you in the minds of others;  3. Authenticity – the behaviors that cause others to judge you as honest, open, and ‘real’;  4. Clarity – the ability to explain your ideas and articulate your views;  5. Empathy – the ability to ‘connect’ with others.  You can get it (and read a descriptive summary) at Chapters book store online at http://www.chapters.indigo.ca/item.asp?Item=978078797938&Catalog=Books&Ntt=social+intelligence&N=35&Lang=en&Section=books&zxac=1 for $21.43 (which is 33% off the list price right now).  5 star must reading.   Click here to read detailed highlights of the book.

- "Boys Will Be Boys: Breaking the Link between Masculinity and Violence". Miedzian, Myriam. Doubleday, 1991. This book provides statistically backed research explaining why 90%+ of our prisons are filled with men, why poor male youth are most likely to be causes or victims of violence, the links between men and war, sports and violence, TV and violence, and generally how our culture currently promotes violence in males.

- The Top 10 Principles of Individual Transformation http://www.topten.org/content/tt.BA7.htm 
-
The Top 10 Questions to Ask Yourself...Regularly http://www.topten.org/content/tt.BA153.htm 
-
The Top 10 Steps to Forgiveness http://www.topten.org/content/tt.BE1.htm

 

5. Peace Education at the Family Level; How to build peace at the family level

Required texts -

- Families as Educators for Global Citizenship - Edited by Judith A. Myers-Walls, Péter Somlai, and Robert N. Rapoport.  All people and regions of the world are deeply affected by world events, no matter how closely they embrace or how actively they try to resist their impact. This book explores some of the ways globalization has changed and formed children, youth, and families. It defines some of the ways that culture, politics, religion, and world events have altered the attitudes, behaviors, and well-being of families. It also outlines some of the approaches that families have taken, and could take, in adapting to the changing world around them. Authors provide perspectives from over 20 countries and from many professional backgrounds, including sociology, psychology, religion, political science, peace studies, environmental studies, and economics. Suggestions are given for future research studies, interventions with families, and the construction of public policies.  Contents: Families as Educators for Global Citizenship: How families teach each their children about the world, Judith A. Myers-Walls; Global citizenship: an essay on its contradictions, Péter Somlai; Families and globalization: a new social contract and agenda for research, Constance A. Flanagan; Families as educators for global citizenship: additional contributions and reflections, Jens Qvortrup, Saad Eddin Ibrahim, Wilfreid Dumon, Lynne Chisholm, Constance A. Flanagan and Robert N. Rapoport. Families, Modernization, and Globalization: Negotiation strategies in modern families: what does it mean for global citizenship?, Manuela du Bois-Reymond; The impact of modernization on elder-care: the case of Taiwan, Hsiang-Ming Justine Kung and Chin-ChunYi; Transformations of family norms: parents' expectations of their children's family life style, Hideki Watanabe; Task sharing and sex role attitudes in Greek returnees: a combination of cross-sectional and longitudinal data, Despina Sakka and Maria Dikaiou; Globalization, community violence and family: an anthropologist's account from Northern Ghana, Peter Skalník; Reflections from a war zone: a partial essay and memorial tribute, Andjelka Milic; Families, modernization and globalization: additional contributions and reflections, Peter Skalník, Zuzana Kusá, Natalia Lakiza-Sachuk, Evguenia Atchildieva, Judith A. Myers-Walls, Yael Azmon, Jens Qvortrup, Raquel Cohen-Orantes and Saad Eddin Ibrahim. Families as Educators: Hungarian adolescents' attitudes toward their future, peace, and the environment, Olga Tóth; The tradition and change of family education in mainland China, Dai Keijing with Judith A. Myers-Walls; Families as environmental educators in the Sahel, Ousmane Thioune with Judith A. Myers-Walls; War, mothers, and a girl with braids: involvement of mothers' peace groups in the national discourse in Israel, Yael Azmon; Religion, spirituality, and the family: challenges for global citizenship, Jacqueline Haessley and Judith A. Meyers-Walls; The parents' role in educating about war and peace, Judith A. Meyers-Walls; Families as educators: additional contributions and reflections, Willy LaHaye, Furugh Switzer, Margaret Obondo, Raquel Cohen-Orantes, Hamilton McCubbin and Riitta Wahlsrom.  Edited by Judith A. Myers-Walls, Purdue University , USA , Péter Somlai, University of Eötvös , Hungary and Robert N. Rapoport, formerly of the Institute of Family and Environmental Research, UK ISBN: 1-85972-356-x February 2001 244 pages $69.95 Hardback.  You can order this book online at http://www.ashgate.com.  There is a 15% discount for online orders.  Judith A. Myers-Walls, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, Child Development and Family Studies, 1269 Fowler House, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN  47907-1269; phone: 765-494-2959; fax: 765-494-0503; e-mail: myerswal@cfs.purdue.edu

- From a review by Joanie Connors: I would like to recommend a book I just found out about although it is three years old.  I probably missed it because it is written by family therapists (I take no journals in family therapy), but I think this is a landmark book about the origins of human violence.  The book is "Ghosts from the Nursery: Tracing the Roots of Violence" by Robin Karr-Morse and Meredith Wiley (1997, New York : Atlantic Monthly Press).  The book appears to be heavily rooted in the scientific literature about violence, and it combines research from numerous disciplines in a way that brings us forward a notch in the understanding of violence.   In "Ghosts from the Nursery" the authors assert that the root of violent behavior is in the first 33 months of life.  She presents evidence that early chemical and physical insults to the fetus' (prenatal exposure to alcohol and drugs), infant's and toddler's minds alter their cognitive processes enough (high prevalence of ADHD & ADD) that they are later unable to learn about, understand and cope with life's difficulties, whether those difficulties be the loss of social face or a habitually violent home life. They then resort to the black and white logic of violent tactics they've seen modeled either in their home or in the society at large.  The authors make a plea for us to become a more compassionate society that values our babies and young children enough to promote policies focusing on improving their welfare.  Appendix A includes a list of "Factors associated with Violent Behavior that can be Modifies or Prevented by Early Intervention" (pp. 299-300). 

- PEACE BUILDING THROUGH MARRIAGE EDUCATION - Susan Heitler has written to remind us that marriage education is an important aspect of peace education; not only because it fosters peace between couples, but also because "couples who model cooperation for their children teach by their actions, as well as by their instruction, that talking and listening gets people more of what they want in life than from fighting."  Susan's book "The Power of Two" and her video "The Angry Couple:  Conflict-Focused Treatment" are useful resources for college courses and workshops with couples.  For further information contact Susan Heitler at heitler@henge.com .
- PGS announces the launch its
"Peaceful Childhoods" education kits. This folder of materials has been developed for the use of parents, health practitioners, child care workers, teachers and anyone else who cares about children and the future. It is our hope that children reared nonviolently will grow into caring and nonviolent adults who are able to help achieve a more peaceful world.  The Peaceful Childhoods folder contains the following items: Children and the Media: Choosing Peaceful Story Telling brochure; Children and War Toys: Encouraging Peaceful Play brochure; Guns and Children: What Parents Need to Know brochure; Peaceful Childrearing: Fostering Peace in Our Homes brochure; Violence-free Zone poster; Family Covenant of Non-Violence; Additional Resources; Feedback form.  The Violence-free Zone poster can be displayed in waiting rooms, classrooms or playrooms to encourage peaceful play and to indicate an area where violent toys, games or video games are not permitted.  If you interested in receiving a copy of the kit or would like to have one sent to someone please contact me at pgs@web.ca .  Debbie Grisdale, Executive Director,  Physicians for Global Survival (Canada), #208-145 Spruce St., Ottawa ON CANADA  K1R 6P1; Tel: 613 233 1982 / Fax: 613 233 9028; www.pgs.ca
- Peaceful Parents, Peaceful Kids: Practical Ways to Create a Calm and Happy Home by Naomi Drew.  Naomi Drew is the author of three books and has specialized in the field of conflict resolution and peacemaking for over 18 years. Her work is of great benefit to all people who care about children and care about living peaceful lives. She brings a unique perspective to parents and teachers by providing them with strategies to create peaceful homes and schools. Ms. Drew's work has been acclaimed over the years by many child development and educational leaders across the country. For example, Dr. Maurice Elias, co-author of Emotionally Intelligent Parenting, calls her latest book Peaceful Parents, Peaceful Kids, "a wonderful tool for parents." Michele Borba, Ed.D., Author of Parents Do Make a Difference, calls it "a gem that should be on every parent's nightstand," and Publisher's Weekly praises it as "inspiring and useful." In this current climate of youth violence, helping parents and teachers learn the skills of peacemaking is not only necessary, but essential.  We hope the Learning Peace website will provide you with plenty of practical information to get you on the path to peaceful parenting. For more information, and see introduction and table of contents, visit the website at
http://www.learningpeace.com/
-
Domestic Violence Information Manual - http://www.infoxchange.net.au/wise/DVIM/index.htm

 

6. Peace Education at the Community Level; How to build peace at the community level

Required texts -

- community strategies for peace education

- community peace education resource libraries (books, videos, etc.)

- conflict transformation mechanisms in every community

- Safe and Caring Schools and Communities Programs

- Making Peace Where I Live - This is a learning guide designed to support young people in researching the peacemaking traditions in their own communities.  It is an international curriculum based on teaching the skills of oral history so that young people may interview local peacemakers in their communities.  It is intended as a contribution to UNESCO’s Year and Decade for Education for a Culture of Peace.  The group is interested in networking with other groups in other countries who are interested in developing materials for youth projects focused on local peacemaking as a way of strengthening peacebuilding capacities both for the children and for the communities in which they live. This project is being developed by an independent group of peace educators from New England .  It includes a supplement for teachers or youth leaders.  Materials can be downloaded from the CRInfo website.  Organization:  Making Peace Where I Live (MAPWIL).  Cost:  $9 for a hard copy.  CONTACT:  Dr. Mary Lee Morrison, 129 Penn Drive, West Hartford , CT 06119 , USA . T: 1-802-875-4727; Email: Marylee898@home.com, Website:  www.crinfo.org

- "PeaceJam:  How Young People Can Make Peace in Their Schools and Communities".  Both the book and the DVD/Video feature 12 Nobel Peace Prize Laureates working with youth, and they are an extremely powerful tool for working with young people.  Please let your membership know about this extremely effective kit, which costs less than $50!   The Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, and ten other Nobel Peace Prize winners helping young people in crisis -- what an amazing combination!  See http://www.peacejam.org/

- The Citizens' Circle for Accountability (CCA) is a non-profit organization created as a prime resource on the concept, meaning and importance of public accountability. The CCA is also a resource for citizens on strategies for holding fairly to account, and is a forum for the exchange of ideas and strategies through the Journal of Public Accountability on the CCA's website. The connection of public accountability to peace is clear: since peace is a function of citizens, governments and corporations being fair to others, citizens must engage levers that give them a "proper understanding of matters" and at the same time exert a self-regulating influence on  those in authority responsible for bringing about peace. As citizens, we have yet to demand that the authorities whose intentions and actions are key to peace (largely the directing minds of executive governments and corporations) tell us, fully,  fairly and publicly, what they specifically intend as outcomes, for whom, and why they intend it. They must also tell us their own performance standards for their responsibilities.  Since the public answering obligation is central to democracy, the demand for this public answering is unassailable. The CCA website links to the comprehensive book on public accountability by Henry E. McCandless, A Citizen's Guide to Public Accountability: Changing the Relationship Between Citizens and Authorities (CCA and Trafford Publishing, 2002).  For more info: Citizens' Circle for Accountability, www.accountabilitycircle.org   877 Newport Ave., Victoria, BC, Canada,  V8S 5C8; telephone 250-370-5954; fax 250-370-5958; email: henrymccandless@accountabilitycircle.org

- Community Action Manual for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights - http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/peace/peaceedu/comactiondec.html - an extemely useful set of ideas for school students of all ages.

- violence in the workplace programs

 

7. Peace Education at the National and World Levels; How to build peace at the national and world levels; the United Nations and world governance; civil liberties vs. security; weapons of mass destruction

Required texts -

- national strategies for peace education

- An Idea who's time has come: World peace & future security will be best served by a strong, effective and democratic United Nations   see http://www.peace.ca/un.htm ; United Nations reform; International Criminal Court

- Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) - More relevant today in the world of Neo-conservatives, American Hegemony, the Patriot Act, prisoner torture in Afghanistan, Guantanamo and Abu Graib, Corporate controlled media and government, etc.  1984 is not a prediction of what the world will be like in 1984; it is, instead, a warning that unless the course in which the world drifts is changed, man will lose his most human attributes.  I would recommend everyone to watch the excellent movie adaptation made in 1984, starring John Hurt and Richard Burton, which I think is one of the best book adaptations made for cinema. While it can't contain all the levels and issues presented in the original book, it adds images and voices and makes the reading of the book extremely realistic.       http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0087803/  Then you "must read" the book, and the Coles Notes discussion.  It's hard to describe what many consider the best book ever written. This masterpiece novel works on so many levels, that I guess every reader would find something else in it. It deals with the basic and most important issues in life, society, government, wars, religion, education, brain-wash, the place of the individual, the hardship of being alone (physically and mentally), the concept of holding two contradictious thoughts at the same time, the position of the individual in history, the nothingness of being human, love, family, loyalty and betrayal, the instinct of any animal in nature to survive, and so much, much more.  The exaggerated ideals 1984 expresses, represents the oppression felt by many in the world that is gilded by a thought of true freedom. The story is very descriptive and allows the reader to feel the true emotions that the main character, Winston Smith is feeling. Orwell shows that in our world everything is deceptive to reality. Conformity is the main concern for the masses working for the elite and even the name Winston Smith is symbolic for this lack of individualistic qualities. This book shows the militaristic tactics used by the government of "Big Brother" to inspire people to work and keep an interest in the common good. Every four years the government of Oceania started a fake war with one of the other two super powers to maintain the work ethic and inspiration of the slaving people in the middle class. Winston represents all people who rebel against the system and know that the illusions presented by the government of aristocrats are wrong. He represents the middle class which work as tools of the elite and the proletarians are the people who the government leaves to their own ignorance. 1984 holds a great amount of symbolism and connects fiction with the real world.  Read summaries and reviews at http://www.k-1.com/Orwell/index.cgi/work/summaries/1984.htmlSee the 2002 real version in London, England.  And in the United States.  See highlighted Quotes from 1984 and its analysis.

- The Day After - "Apocalypse ... The End of the Familiar ... The Beginning of the End.  The most powerful and controversial television event of our time.  A potent drama -probably the most controversial TV movie of its time.  Lawrence , Kansas is the very center of the United States , a small town community of good people whose daily lives embody the same hopes, dreams and fears of us all.  Then comes the day that the unthinkable happens: War is declared, and a full-scale exchange of nuclear missiles rains an atomic hell upon our very way of life.  Devastation is global, with America reduced to a ravaged wasteland of sickness, violence and death.  But for the survivors, this man-made apocalypse has only just begun.  Humanity's true horror starts on 'The Day After'.  The Day After is an astonishing glimpse into mankind's greatest nightmare and widely considered to be the most horrific depiction ever of nuclear holocaust.  Jason Robards, John Lithgow, JoBeth Williams, Amy Madigan and Steve Guttenberg lead a remarkable cast in this Emmy Award winning television landmark that continues to be one of the most disturbing -- and important -- films of our time.  The premiere of this TV movie was a major media event. No sponsors bought commercial time after the point in the movie where the nuclear war occurs, so the last half of the show was aired straight through, without commercials. ABC set up special 1-800 hotlines to calm people down during and after the original airing.  Immediately after the film's original broadcast, it was followed by a special news program, featuring a live discussion between scientist Dr. Carl Sagan (who opposed the use of nuclear weapons) and Conservative writer William F. Buckley Jr. (who promoted the concept of "nuclear deterrence"). It was during this heated discussion, aired live on network television, where Dr. Sagan introduced the world to the concept of "nuclear winter" and made his famous analogy, equating the nuclear arms race with "two men standing waist deep in gasoline; one with three matches, the other with five".  The Day After was watched by an estimated half the adult population, the largest audience for a made-for-TV movie to that time. To order: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0085404/ ; review: http://www.museum.tv/archives/etv/D/htmlD/dayafterth/dayafter.htm .  Other films of this genre: Threads http://www.ibp-intl.demon.co.uk/nuke/threads.html ; The War Game http://www.bfi.org.uk/videocat/more/wargame/ available from www.Amazon.com   

- Cialdini, Robert B. - Influence: Science and Practice, Fourth Edition. Allyn & Bacon: 2001 - Chapter by chapter topic summary. This book outlines the categories, uses, tools, and techniques of 'influence' and how to recognize them. This book is a useful tool for understanding the science behind 'influence'. 

 


 

OTHER UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES  (to flesh out in due course)

Suggested Mission : The respective University/College/Institution will use its abilities to advance a Culture of Peace and Non-violence, at home and abroad, by advancing the respective 'action area'.

B. CULTURE OF PEACE AND NON-VIOLENCE ACTION AREAS (the sub-components are derived from the Agenda of the Hague Appeal for Peace, reference http://www.peace.ca/agendaofthehague.htm , are not necessarily all-inclusive, and will evolve over time)

The Naked Corporation: How the Age of Transparency Will Revolutionize Business, by Don Tapscott and David Ticoll.  If you have to be naked, you had better be buff. We are entering an extraordinary age of transparency, where businesses must for the first time make themselves clearly visible to shareholders, customers, employees, partners, and society. Financial data, employee grievances, internal memos, environmental disasters, product weaknesses, international protests, scandals and policies, good news and bad; all can be seen by anyone who knows where to look. Welcome to the world of the naked corporation. Transparency is revolutionizing every aspect of our economy and its industries and forcing firms to rethink their fundamental values.  Don Tapscott, bestselling author and one of the most sought after strategists and speakers in the business world, is famous for seeing into the future and pointing out both its forest and its trees. David Ticoll, visionary researcher, columnist, and consultant, has identified countless breakthrough trends at the intersection of technology and business strategy. These two longtime collaborators now offer a brilliant guide to the new age of openness. In The Naked Corporation, they explain how the new transparency has caused a power shift toward customers, employees, shareholders, and other stakeholders; how and where information has exploded; and how corporations across many industries have seized on transparency not as a challenge but as an opportunity. The Naked Corporation is a book for managers, employees, investors, customers, and anyone who cares about the future of the corporation, government, education and society. A new age is upon us, and you can either work with it and thrive, or fight it and die.  http://www.nakedcorporation.com/

 

·        Provincial/Territorial Culture of Peace Programs (13) (mirroring above where relevant) (13 Yahoo Groups, dialogue, inclusive)

o       Alberta http://groups.yahoo.com/group/albertapeaceeducation/

o       Quebec http://groups.yahoo.com/group/quebecpeaceeducation/

o           Manitoba http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ManitobaPeaceEducation/ 

Proposed Courses:

(for future development)

 

Notes:

1. This document is based on merging the Organizational Network document http://www.peace.ca/CCOPPorganization2004.htm with an earlier Distance Peace Education Proposal http://www.peace.ca/distancepeaceeducationproposal.htm (there is 'preamble' information in this latter document that it would be worth your reading). 

2. A point re terminology: Peace Studies vs. Peace Education.  There have been articles written on the difference.  Peace Studies is relatively historic, "what is", and passive.  Peace Education is relatively action oriented, "what should be", futuristic, solutions oriented.  CCOPP advocates Peace Education, and would suggest using this term.

3. the required texts and curricula indicated above are provided for example.  Additional resources can be found at http://www.peace.ca/curricula.htm and http://www.peace.ca/info.htm .  I would suggest each of these topics for courses should be workshopped (by a broad team from each University and others) to consider inclusiveness, and best 'required texts', curricula, etc.

4. I would imagine each University that leads a particular Group might wish to manage the respective email listserver.

5. Since University funding is limited, and there is so much important work that needs to be done, there is a need to ask for financial support from many sources.  This will require a well thought out fund raising strategy.

6. One may foresee a leadership role for the respective Universities in advancing the respective missions in Canada (following the Servant Leadership model and all those good things we have discussed) - this would be within a framework of CCOPP and a consortium of educational and other institutions. 

7. One might sum it up as follows: (1) The University as the gap-filler and watchdog of gap-filling and course attribution across the country. (2) The University as model or prototype of grassroots (community, families, diverse sub-cultures and faith communities, provincial) inter-change, dialogue, or seeding COP, learning to reap what had been sown and how to employ the ever-expanding harvest. (3) The University as model or prototype of strategic ('macro' level, 'big picture', national, international) inter-change, dialogue, or seeding COP, learning to reap what had been sown and how to employ the ever-expanding harvest. If this isn't crystal clear, it is meant to stress the two-way process of taking peace education to the community while learning and reshaping our peace education from the community (i.e. service learning or praxis).